January 26, 2010

Human Sexuality Online Course

Human Sexuality Online Course
Human Sexuality CEUS
Human Sexuality Continuing Education
Interns and License Renewal
Full text Click here
Human Sexuality
(10 hours/units)
© 2009 by Aspira Continuing Education. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be transmitted or reproduced in any form, or by any means, mechanical or electronic without written permission of Aspira Continuing Education.

1. Define the different study/research areas of human sexuality.
2. Increase familiarity with concepts related to the psychology of sex
3. Identify and evaluate clinical perspectives related to sexual activity and lifestyles.
4. Explore the impact religious belief systems on sex.
5. Learn specific laws related to sex and sexual crimes.
6. Identify the causes and symptoms of STDs
7. Increase familiarity with sexual disorders
Table of Contents:
1. Definition
2. Psychology and Sex
3. Sexual Activity and Lifestyles
4. Religion and Sex
5. The Law and Sex
6. Sexually Transmitted Diseases
7. Masters and Johnson
8. Sexual Disorders
9. References

1. Definition
Human sexuality can be defined as the manner in which people experience and express themselves as sexual beings. There are many facets in the study of human sexuality including:
• Biological
• Emotional
• Physical
• Sociological
• Philosophical
(Ellen Ross, Rayna Rapp Sex and Society: A Research Note from Social History and Anthropology Comparative Studies in Society and History).
From a biological perspective, sexuality is defined as “the reproductive mechanism as well as the basic biological drive that exists in all species and can encompass sexual intercourse and sexual contact in all its forms”. There are also emotional or physical perspectives of sexuality, which refers to the “bond that exists between individuals, which may be expressed through profound feelings or emotions, and which may be manifested in physical or medical concerns about the physiological or even psychological aspects of sexual behavior”. Sociologically, it includes the cultural, political, and legal aspects of sexual behavior. Philosophically, it emphasizes the moral, ethical, theological, spiritual or religious aspects of sexual behavior (Ellen Ross, Rayna Rapp Sex and Society: A Research Note from Social History and Anthropology Comparative Studies in Society and History).

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